Mark 9 Hawk

Following the success of  “Space: 1999’s” Eagle, the Mark 9 Hawk improved on the technology and construction techniques developed for its sister ship. The smaller size of the Hawk makes it a much more agile and maneuverable craft.

This is one of three still flying Hawk warships. Producer Gerry Anderson’s production philosophy was to recycle and re-use many of the ships he created over the years, and it’s due to his insistence of storing his vehicles for use in future productions that account for so many of them surviving into our century.

 

Although not as famous as the Eagle, the Mark 9 Hawk is a beautiful example of starship design. At a quick glance it’s obviously related to the Eagle in manufacture and design, but it also communicates that it’s further along the design evolution – more powerful, and more sleek.

In the early 1980’s the ship was donated to the British Design Museum to promote British design and as a tax write-off. The robust foundation of the Museum provided the funds for a restoration in 1992-1993. The Design Museum has graciously loaned out the Hawk to the Sci-Fi Air Show for this season.

British pilot and curator William Turner states, “The ship is a real joy to fly. The only part of the interior that was finished was the cockpit area although it was never shown in the series. There is no real door to enter the craft, only a small hatch on the bottom of the nose. The cockpit holds a pilot and a co-pilot and has a jump seat in the back for a single passenger. I grew up watching the show and it’s a real thrill for me to be entrusted to care and pilot the ship.”

Click on the images to see a larger version.

Possessing vertical thrusters, the Hawk doesn’t require a runway to take off and land.
Although not as famous as the Eagle, the Mark 9 Hawk is a beautiful example of starship design. 

 

The smaller Mark 9 Hawk is a much more agile and maneuverable craft than its sister-ship the Eagle.

 

At the airshow you can see one of three still flying Hawk warships.